Translating “owning choice”

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    • #7770
      Gillian
      Keymaster

      As promised in Sunday’s webinar, here’s a start to a conversation about translating “If I own my choices about what I eat…”

      My first thought about it is that it’s “owning choices” that’s the bit that’s not translating easily. Yes? So, owning is about ownership, about the choices belonging to you: “this choice is mine”. Can it be, “If the choices about what I eat belong to me…” – does that work?

      Any better ideas?

    • #7771
      Penny B
      Participant

      If I accept that I, and I alone, decide what I eat…..
      I am in control of what I eat
      I take responsibility for everything I eat…

      Maybe?
      Pxx

      • #7780
        Gillian
        Keymaster

        If it works for you, that’s fine, but some others here may share the problem I have with the word ‘responsibility’ which is why I don’t tend to use it. It’s really not my intention to imply this:

    • #7772
      Gillian
      Keymaster

      I was hoping for foreign-language translation, especially Serbian.

      It came up in the webinar, with Ivana not able to translate “If I own my choices…”

      Penny, is that lockdown hair you’ve got?

    • #7773
      Valeria
      Participant

      If the choices about what I eat belong only to me
      If the choices about what I eat were only mine

    • #7776
      Ivana P
      Participant

      Gillian,
      As far as I am concerned, your suggestion seems completely fine: “If the choices about what I eat belong to me…”

      My personal, perhaps non-linguistic, problem is that conditional “If” at the beginning of the sentence. I know that choices about what I eat are mine, and pretty aware that they don’t belong to anyone alse. So, I feel that there is no need to remind myself what would happen if choices were mine… However, when I overeat, I don’t think about having the choice at all. So, would help (actually, it did the job for few nights ago) to remind myself to the fact that there is a choice. It seems that “Since the choices about what I eat belong to me…” would work perfectly for me. Does it make sense?

    • #7778
      Gillian
      Keymaster

      Okay. Sounds good to me. This might make a lot more sense after the Week 3 webinar because that’s about how best to make a choice not to overeat.

      I do note, though, that you scored 128 on the “Exploring Choice” exercise (Part A at 1.8 on the Dashboard). That’s a high score so there could be a bit more to this issue of free choice than you’re seeing right now. Maybe you’ve turned it around in the last week or maybe it’s something that’s going to present itself as a problem later on. Let’s see what happens?

    • #7781
      Julie Mann
      Participant

      This is so good. Not only do I have that experience Ivana mentions, “However, when I overeat, I don’t think about having the choice at all. So, would help (actually, it did the job for few nights ago) to remind myself to the fact that there is a choice.” But also my Exploring Choice number was also quite high. I know that choice is an area where I “lose the plot” as you say.

    • #7791
      lara w
      Participant

      I’m having a problem with “owning my choices,” too. I mean, every time I eat, whatever I eat, it is my own choice. No one else is making it for me. Today I chose to eat a very unhealthy lunch, and I suffered physically for it, but it was MY choice. I owned it.

    • #7795
      Gillian
      Keymaster

      Hi Lara,

      Everything you say here makes great sense – BUT – the issue of owning choice becomes much more relevant in the choice not to overeat (ie eat things you don’t need, such as that lunch).

      Yes, you get that you chose a “very unhealthy lunch”. Fine. But what if you really, really wanted it because it looked so delicious and you’d enjoy it so much, and you didn’t eat it and ate something healthy and a bit boring or bland instead?

      That is when it becomes easy to deny choice. You also had a high score on the Exploring Choice exercise, so I’m posting this as a “watch out” for you. When you describe desire (2.8 Exploring Desire) you say, “It’s as if there’s another person controlling me, forcing me…” and that’s exactly what can happen when you don’t take a stand on your own grasp of free choice.

      And, I’m not telling you what choices to make, by the way. Maybe you will continue to eat the unhealthy lunches; it’s the concept I’m wanting to get across.

    • #7800
      Ivana P
      Participant

      Gillian,
      Sorry if I am transforming this in the off-topic thread; we may open another more directly connected to “owning choice”.

      Thank you for your comment on something more on the issue of free choice in my case. When you were telling your story about the walk in the countryside, I was asking myself at the crossroad: “where would I go?” And I had no dilemma: I would turn left to see that gorgeous lake, instead going straight to the hotel. Why? Because I wouldn’t want to miss it at that very moment. Because of that expectation of something beautiful and also unknown to me. Because I would want to “get more” of the walk, even if I was tired. It seems that it has to do with attractiveness of the “left turn” compared to the plain, usual, common (boring?) “right turn”.
      As I am hedonistic when it comes to food and enjoy preparing it, as much as eating, I do tend to make similar choices with food. I am ready to “turn right” even if I know it’s not the best choice for me: I would choose to explore and “get more”. More taste, more novelty, more whatever. So, I sense the outline of “something” in the darkness, but I have to explore it more. Knowing myself, it will probably take a while. It’s certainly an issue for me.

      Just being curious and certainly off-topic:). How do we interpret our scores from the “Exploring Choice” exercise? I know my answers and the final result, but I am curious about what’s behind the number.

    • #7806
      Gillian
      Keymaster

      Ivana P

      With the first part, about the walk in the countryside, I was speaking about evaluating alternatives in order to make a choice. But they could be different alternatives; what if bears live by the lake and often attack people? You’d want to see the lake, but at risk to life and limb?

      You love to get “more taste, more novelty, more whatever”, but what is the risk? I have no way of knowing how it is for you – but there are people who knock a decade or two off their lives as a direct result of their overeating. And/or a decade or two of good health in the same way. So really they end up with less taste, less novelty, less whatever.

      AND it’s still important to evaluate these possibilities with free choice in mind. You are still free to go see the lake and get attacked by a bear. My own priorities are to be pain-free, not on any medication, full of energy, for as long as I can. But this is my choice, at least for now.

      Interpreting scores from the “Exploring Choice” exercise, is not too precise; it just gives you an idea of the size of the problem. The lowest I’ve seen is 60 and most are over 100. It would be ideal to score close to zero.

    • #7857
      Louise
      Participant

      I am slightly struggling with the meaning of ‘if I own my choices…’ – probably over-thinking it! Would it be okay for others to share some of their completed sentences for this?

    • #7858
      lara w
      Participant

      I’ll give it a go, Louse. Not sure if it will be helpful, but here’s what I’ve come up with. I find that I have “positive” responses and “negative” responses (eg. what I would do, and what I wouldn’t do).

      If I own my choices about what I eat:
      I will choose foods that make me feel good and nourish my body.
      I will enjoy my food more.
      I won’t starve myself.
      I won’t stuff myself.
      I will eat just the right amount of food.
      I won’t obsess over food.
      I hope this helps!

    • #7880
      Jill S
      Participant

      I know I’m going to have to face off a lot of internal resistance to overcome and take control of my addictive eating patterns as they’ve been embedded so long. Sabotaging behaviour has been kicking in this week. ‘Owning’ feels like such a powerful word at the moment as I’m deep down scared of taking control of something I’m so attached to and have relied on to ‘stay safe’/self-limit. I know my subconscious has been resisting it (avoidance, mindless, impulsive eating some days). It’s like I want to self sabotage more because Gillian’s approach on choice is making sense. I know this has been discussed in another post but in terms of the meaning of owning choice instead I’ve been saying:

      ‘If I acknowledge my choice about what I eat…’

      and

      ‘If I recognise my choice about what I eat…’

      saying these feels gentler and makes me feel I’m honouring myself as part of the decision. I know it’s just playing with meaning but feeling my way and paying attention to what my head/mind is saying/doing seems they key thing right now to stick with the moment and extend thoughts to the outcome of my choice as that’s the more difficult part to take on.

      • #7894
        Gillian
        Keymaster

        Jill, any time you become fearful of “taking control of something you’re so attached to and have relied on” – bring yourself into the present time and be willing not to know how things will go in the future. You seem to be assuming a once-and-for-all decision – and that will inevitably set up resistance, self-sabotage, and rebellious overeating.

        Better to take all this on with a view to try it out and see what happens, and if you don’t like it you can always go back to your old ways. It will take off a lot of pressure and anxiety.

        The future doesn’t exist. Not only that, but you can only know for sure what food choices you’ll make in the present time.

    • #7881
      guadalupe
      Participant

      Hi Everyone!

      I think that to translate and understand the meaning, its good to check LINGUEE or WORDREFERENCE. They have so many languages and also they have some expressions in your language or in english to make it easier to understand the concept.
      Here I put one that made me easier understand the concept and apply to choose what to eat, and to take that decision by my own, by myself.

      own choice (decision made freely)
      own choice (individual free will)
      My parents wanted me to go to law school, but I made my own choice and attended art school instead.

    • #7883
      Louise
      Participant

      Thanks Lara for your example, that’s really helpful, and Jill, yes, I see that describing the outcomes of a choice is a good way of fully ‘owning’ it and acknowledging that it’s my choice.

    • #7895
      Jill S
      Participant

      Hi Gillian, thank you, yes the present feels free of pressure. I feel instant relief when I’m back in it. I can’t start to overcomplicate things there!

      ‘Owning my choice’ is like ‘feeling present and free to set a specific intention’

    • #7906
      lara w
      Participant

      Great help there, Guadalupe! Thank you!

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